Curriculum Standards

CompuGirls aligns with Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Standards. Expand the selections below to find out more information.

Next Generation Science Standards

Overview

HS-ETS1-1: Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.

HS-ETS1-2: Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

HS-ETS1-3: Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.

HS-ETS1-4: Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.

Course 1

Digital storytelling (Course 1)

Standard Activity name Description
HS-ETS1-1
  1. Session 1: Intro to Social Justice
  2. Session 1: Intro to Research Paper
  3. Session 2: Review of Past CompuGirls' Video Projects
  1. Participants are introduced to the idea of social justice issues and asked to think about how role of values, beliefs and norms of the individual and/or community influence solutions to a global problem.

  2. Participants are introduced to research paper, databases, and how to utilize these in order to help them find information on a global challenge.

  3. Participants analyze components of past video projects with a social justice lens.

HS-ETS1-2
  1. Session 4: Group Research Planning

  2. Session 9: Storyboarding

  1. Participants work in a collaborative environment where they brainstorm ideas for their research projects. Participants brainstorm possible solutions by breaking down a larger problem.

  2. Student storyboard their project and discuss how they can solve their project using the technology at hand and involving the community.

HS-ETS1-3
  1. Session 2: Video Evaluation

  2. Session 2: Mentor Teacher Project Presentations

  3. Session 8: Video Documentary

  1. Participants are asked to discuss how to evaluate and provide feedback on past video projects. They are then asked to create a feedback they will follow.

  2. Mentor Teachers show their own video documentaries and planning, participants can then evaluate based on rubric they created.

  3. Participants view bad examples of what not to do, discuss what changes could be made to improve, and implement into their own projects.

HS-ETS1-4
  1. Session 10: Storyboards and Presentation

  2. Session 19: Group Research Project Planning

  1. Using the session’s technology, girls create and present their solutions to a community problem at hand; receiving feedback and modifying throughout the program.

  2. All research culminates into final technology program where they present their solutions to a social justice issue, using the rubric they created at the beginning.

Course 2

Think like a programmer, design like a change agent (Course 2)

Standard Activity name Description
HS-ETS1-1
  1. Module 2: Activity and Time/Pair/Share

  2. Module 3: Reflecting: Design Notebook Question

  1. Girls discuss personal care products and how they are presented in the media. Discuss why it is important to view images in context of culture.

  2. Girls discuss feminism, common stereotypes, social movements, and how these terms might keep girls and women from voicing their opinions.

HS-ETS1-2
  1. Module 4: Research topics and Research Questions

  2. Module 19:Creating: Open-ended designing Time/Pair/Share

  1. Participants discuss research topic, the role the research question plays in gathering research, and begin brainstorming solutions.

  2. Participants continue to work on projects and discuss with a neighbor about solutions to their research topic and how they’re incorporating it into their Scratch program.

HS-ETS1-3
  1. Module 9: How did you do that?

  2. Module 21: Exploring: Critique Groups

  3. Module 23: Planning: Preparing for Final Project Reflection

  1. Participants share their research, proposed solutions, and scripts incorporated into their program. Participants can give sandwich compliments and compare projects.

  2. Participants fill out project feedback handout and return paper to the creators following sandwich complement format.

  3. Participants practice presenting their projects to each other and share final modification suggestions.

HS-ETS1-4
  1. Module 7: Exploring Resources

  2. Module 9: Making it interactive

  3. Module 25:Reflecting: Celebration and Final Project Reflection

  1. Participants use technology to virtually experience reaching important resources in different neighborhoods. They then discuss which is easier, how it relates to social justice, who should care about the ease of access to resources, and more.

  2. Participants work with sprites in the Scratch program and demonstrate how they can use their project for their research topic.

  3. Participants share their final Scratch projects, which includes problem, solution, and call to action from its audience.


 

Course 3

Virtual worlds for social change (Course 3)

Standard Activity name Description
HS-ETS1-1
  1. Module 3: Online Identity Exercise

  2. Module 3: Social Justice Scavenger Hunt

  1. Participants assume a different cultural representation in-world and discuss virtual experiences and compare to real world.

  2. Participants find elements in-world related to social justice issues or representations of equity or equality and discuss how it resonates to their personal research and project goals.

HS-ETS1-2
  1. Module 3: Topic Choice Thinking about the Definition of Social Justice Issue

  2. Module 4: Storyboarding your build

  1. Participants will begin to discuss how their projects advance their communities, encourage people to act, and extend research on their project.

  2. Participants look at projects more critically – revisiting rubrics they have used in the past – and discuss how they will use their build to propose a solution.

HS-ETS1-3
  1. Module 4: Social Justice Oriented Sites

  2. Module 5: Project Check-in and Discussion

  1. Participants will visit grids where people are examining Social Justice issues and critique sites using rubric. They also discuss if they agree with how it is being portrayed and how they would change it.

  2. Participants visit each other’s projects and provide feedback and follow up questions.

HS-ETS1-4
  1. Module 4: Girls work in-world

  2. Module 7: Girls showcase work in Closing Ceremony

  1. Participants create build based on their storyboard proposal, ensuring their build represents their research topic question and has a call for action for their community and all stakeholders.

  2. Participants showcase their work to community members, family, and friends at Closing Ceremony.

Course 4

Co-Robotics for CompuGirls (Course 4)

Standard Activity name Description
HS-ETS1-1
  1. Week 1, Day 2: Like A Girl

  2. Week 2, Day 1: Equity vs Equality Discussion

  1. Participants discuss identities that are fluid and constructed and how inequities materialize through stereotypical and judgmental belief systems that people and media impose on people.

  2. Participants discuss connections to equity and equality and how people react to social injustices in the world (with anger, sadness, protest, violence, peaceful protest, etc.)

HS-ETS1-2
  1. Week 1, Day 5: Introduction to Research

  2. Week 3, Day 4: Morning Activities

  1. Participants will revise evaluation rubric to reflect social justice and all robotic components. They have to research and justify why a robot would be the best solution to the problem.

  2. Participants identify different ways that people share crucial information, discuss demographics of people who one would reach with different mediums and outlets, and draft their own version including robotics in their plan.

HS-ETS1-3
  1. Week 2, Day 2: Love has no Labels Video

  2. Week 3, Day 1: Can Robots be Activists?

  1. Participants discuss and evaluate how these examples show people challenging and subverting so called normal expressions of love and how people acting together has power.

  2. Participants are asked what an activist looks like - noticing similarities and differences with others. Participants are then encouraged to discuss what they know about how robots have been designed to interact with people and evaluate their use for their projects.

HS-ETS1-4
  1. Week 4, All: Share and Feedback

  2. Week 5, Day 4: Robot Rally

  1. In this participant-run week, participants share a draft of their projects and receive feedback and modify accordingly.  

  2. Participants showcase their work to community members, family, and friends at Closing Ceremony.

Common Core Standards (English Language Arts/Literacy)

Speaking & Listening

Digital storytelling (Course 1)

Speaking & listening

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  1. Session 1: Introduction Social Justice

  2. Session 2: How to Prepare for a Presentation

  1. Mentor teachers talk about what social justice means and facilitates discussion with all participants -prompting and questioning as needed.

  2. Participants discuss what makes a successful presentation, the role technology plays in shaping understanding of materials presented, and strategies for how to manage public speaking anxiety

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  1. Session 3: How to Form a Research Question

  2. Session 4: Group Research Planning

  1. Participants practice using library databases to find credible and accurate sources to answer research topic questions they brainstormed

  2. Participants present findings and research question to others using multiple sources of information (e.g. visual images, statistics, recordings) evaluating credibility and accuracy of sources.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.3: Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
  1. Session 2: Video Evaluation

  2. Session 7: Group Presentation

  1. Participants discuss the effectiveness of past videos’ use of statistics, visual images and recordings, interviews, and sources. They also discuss strengths and areas of improvement for each.

  2. Participants give sandwich complements to presenting groups paying close attention to use of visual representations, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  1. Session 5: Research Planning

  2. Session 9: Storyboarding

  1. Participants present findings, research question, and supporting evidence in a logical and professional manner.

  2. Participants learn about and create a storyboard outline that their video documentary will follow to allow audience to clearly understand reasoning, organization, and development appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
  1. Session 12: Individual Research Planning

  2. Session 15: Review of the Day/Preview Next Day

  1. Participants present individual and group progress of iMovie, making strategic use of visual representation, audio recordings, textual and graphical information. Participants continue to receive feedback.

  2. Participants present their progress and continue receiving feedback to modify and improve their work.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  1. Session 2: Introduction to Rubric

  2. Session 20: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants discuss how to evaluate and provide feedback and create rubric that will be followed, learning and using new vocabulary.

  2. Participants present their final product using formal language and newly acquired vocabulary related to their research topics.

Writing

Digital storytelling (Course 1)

Writing

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  1. Session 11: Individual Research Planning

  2. Session 16: Group Research Planning

  1. Using evidence from multiple texts, participants are encouraged to write arguments that support their research topics, using valid reasoning and sufficient evidence.

  2. Participants will work collaboratively on GoogleDocs to ensure their research question is answered by using valid reasoning and citing a substantive amount of relevant and credible sources.  

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  1. Session 8: Individual Research Planning

  2. Session 9: Storyboarding

  1. Participants are encouraged to convey information from articles in their own words to ensure their audience understands the information clearly. They are encouraged to work on research outline using effective selection, organization, and analysis of peer-reviewed articles.

  2. Participants create a storyboard with images and text explaining what they will show in their video documentary, when, and why that is the most effective organization of information of their research topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  1. Session 5: Research Planning

  2. Session 9: Individual Research Paper

  1. Participants create presentation of final research question with clear and coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  

  2. Participants are encouraged to continue working on their research paper, ensuring they follow correct APA formatting and organization, vocabulary related to their research topic, and keep audience in mind.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
  1. Session 3: Intro to Podcasting

  2. Session 7: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants create a This I Believe podcast, writing, editing, and revising a script they will follow in order to record their first podcast.

  2. Participants are encouraged to continue working on their research paper, making revisions as needed and focusing on answering research question.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
  1. Session 4: Group Research Planning

  2. Session 12: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants use GoogleDocs to work on research paper collaboratively with the group.

  2. Participants are encouraged to use online survey software (i.e. SurveyMonkey, GoogleForms, etc) in order to display statistical information flexibly and dynamically in their research paper and iMovie projects.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  1.  Session 11: Interviewing

  2. Session 12: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants should conduct interviews to answer their research question, solve a problem, or gather anecdotes to enhance their projects.

  2. Participants are encourage to conduct short research projects by using online survey software to answer their research question

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
  1. Session 3: How to Form a Research Question

  2. Session 7: Group Research Planning

  1. Participants gather 10 articles in databases related to their research topic. They are encouraged to gather print and digital sources.

  2. Participants are encouraged to continue gathering peer-reviewed articles and citing information into their group’s GoogleDoc, following correct APA format

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  1. Session 8: Group Research Planning

  2. Session 11: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants should draw evidence from peer-reviewed articles to support their research topic.

  2. Participants should draw evidence from peer-reviewed articles. They are encouraged to find supporting claims and counterpoints of their research topic, demonstrating varying points of view on the issue.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  1. Session 3: Intro to Podcasting

  2. Session 5: Learning Interviewing Techniques

  3. Session 8: Individual Research Planning

  1. Participants create a script for their This I Believe podcast.

  2. Participants learn about interviewing techniques and write questions they can use to role-play interviewing with partners.

  3. Participants are given time to continue their research and must turn in research paper outline by the end of the day.

Common Core Standards (Mathmatics)

Course 1

Digital storytelling (Course 1)

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.ID.C.9: Distinguish between correlation and causation

Session 7: Qualitative Research Methods

When discussing surveys and data, Mentor Teachers are encouraged to explain the difference between correlation and causation to make statistics more credible when used in projects.  

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.IC.A.1: Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population.

Session 1: Intro to University Library Research 

While learning about peer-reviewed articles and how to read data and statistics, participants are encouraged to make inferences about populations.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.IC.B.3: Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.

Session 1: Introduction to Research Paper

Mentor Teachers describe differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies while discussing purposes for each.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.IC.B.6: Evaluate reports based on data.

Session 4: Group Research Planning

Participants are encouraged to look at sources of data and point out any possible biases and evaluate credibility of peer-reviewed journal based on data.

Course 2

Think like a programmer, design like a change agent (Course 2)

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.2: Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling

Module 1: Scratch Demo

Participants have to distinguish whether the sprite will move 10 steps, turn 15 degrees, or repeat steps a set number of times, etc.  

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

Module 9: Making it Interactive

Participants can estimate where the sprite should end up or code for the sprite to "stop before touching the edge". They use their best judgment on what level of accuracy is needed.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.BF.A.1: Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities.

Module 15: Creating: A-maze-ing

Participants can create games where relationships between functions and values are used (i.e. increase points, switch background based on specific criteria, etc)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.BF.A.2: Write arithmetic and geometric sequences both recursively and with an explicit formula, use them to model situations, and translate between the two forms.

Module 17: Creating: Open-Ended Designing

Participants can create scripts that order the sprites to carry out actions such as moving repeatedly using inputs (i.e. when x > y, x == true, y == 0) Arithmetic aspect in coding. Geometric aspect when sprite moves.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.LE.A.1: Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and with exponential functions. Module 14: Exploring: Debug it! Participants are encouraged to view others' projects and infer how that task was completed (i.e. what might the script look like?) linear: it moved plus 10 steps 20 times. exponential: it moved twice as much as last time or choosing when to use a function vs a simple times three block
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.A.2: Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table). Module 1: Scratch Demo Participants move the Scratch sprite, stretch, or resize.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.B.6: Use geometric descriptions of rigid motions to transform figures and to predict the effect of a given rigid motion on a given figure. Module 1: Scratch Demo  Participants predict the effect rigid motions will have on a sprite.(e.g. if they use negative values it will go to the left side of the screen or to the bottom)

Course 3

Virtual worlds for social change (Course 3)

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.2: Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling

Module 3: An introduction to building

Participants learn to "rez" objects onto the land and size them specifically. (e.g. 1 meter by .5 meters)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

Module 3: An Introduction to Building

Participants can estimate where their building blocks should be, or specify the size based on meters. The level of accuracy is as they see fit. They can space their objects away from each other by dragging or specifying the coordinates.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.A.2: Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table).

Module 4: Time to Work

Participants "rez" prims in-world and stretch, rotate, or move objects while building.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.A.5: Given a geometric figure and a rotation, reflection, or translation, draw the transformed figure using, e.g., graph paper, tracing paper, or geometry software. Specify a sequence of transformations that will carry a given figure onto another.

Module 4: Storyboarding your Build

Participants draw out their build plan and scaling in-world as needed.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.B.6: Use geometric descriptions of rigid motions to transform figures and to predict the effect of a given rigid motion on a given figure

Module 5: Time to Work

Participants build using rigid motions in order to create their building.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.D.12: Make formal geometric constructions with a variety of tools and methods (compass and straightedge, string, reflective devices, paper folding, dynamic geometric software, etc.). Copying a segment; copying an angle; bisecting a segment; bisecting an angle; constructing perpendicular lines, including the perpendicular bisector of a line segment; and constructing a line parallel to a given line through a point not on the line.

Module 7: Time to Work

Participants make formal designs using a variety of tools and methods with all the shapes as needed.

Course 4

Co-Robotics for CompuGirls (Course 4)

Standard Activity name Description
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.2: Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling. Week 2, Day 2 Walking Around

Participants program the robot to move and navigate its environment by using measurements and directions. (e.g. Walk .5 meters to the left)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSN.Q.A.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. Week 2, Day 2 Walking Around Participants gauge how far they should program the robot to walk based on its surroundings. They can also specify measurements (i.e. meters) for the robot to walk.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.BF.A.1: Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities. 

Week 3, Day 5 Robotics Lesson

Participants may program robots to carry out actions based on non-static inputs, when using python.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSF.BF.A.2: Write arithmetic and geometric sequences both recursively and with an explicit formula, use them to model situations, and translate between the two forms.

Week 2, Day 4 Robotics Lesson

Participants program robots to carry out actions. (i.e. geometric aspect walking forward, what causes it to move arithmetic aspect when it completes it 5 times, when it senses something close, etc)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.A.2: Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table).

Week 2, Day 2 Walking Around

Participants program robots to walk, rotate joints, etc.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSG.CO.B.6: Use geometric descriptions of rigid motions to transform figures and to predict the effect of a given rigid motion on a given figure.

Week 1, Day 3 How Should the Robot Move?

Participants rotate joints, bend joints, and estimate what that rotation will be. (i.e. move your arm 90 degrees)